Heart Disease: Living Up to the Gift of Life

Denying my symptoms almost resulted in a very negative outcome.

Heart Disease

Don Holmes

By Don Holmes, Personal Care Management Specialist, MedCost

December 9th is a date that holds special meaning for me. Ten years ago, I wasn’t sure I would see December 10th.

In the fall of 2007, I began to notice some occasional, uncomfortable heaviness in my chest, especially during periods of exertion. I initially attributed it to pushing a little too hard, or soreness from a previous workout.

I worked out between three to four times weekly at the YMCA. My routine usually included a 35-minute vigorous jog on the treadmill. On alternate days I lifted weights.

One afternoon after work, I went to the Y to get in an additional workout. Within 5 minutes on the treadmill, I knew something was different. Something was very wrong.

Denying the Symptoms

The heaviness in my chest began much more quickly. It was so painful that I had to stop. As a precaution, I asked the weight room attendants to check my blood pressure. The blood pressure reading was off the charts!

We waited several minutes and took my blood pressure again. It was still in the danger zone.

The attendants said I needed an ambulance, but I insisted on driving home. I told them I would see my doctor the next day. That night the pain lingered as I tried to fall asleep.

The next morning when I arrived at work, I called my doctor’s office and told the nurse what had happened. I gave her the blood pressure readings. She calmly but firmly said: “I want you to hang up immediately and dial 911. You must go to the hospital now.”

It Was Heart Disease

How could I be fit enough to work out frequently and still have this happen? I immediately went to the hospital. A heart catheterization revealed major blockages in the front and back of my heart. Doctors performed a quintuple bypass operation on me.

Heart DiseaseI didn’t realize it, but I had been in denial. In the hospital before surgery, I stared at the legal documents I was about to sign. I had to face reality.

Open heart surgery. I might not come through the operation.

I was extremely fortunate. I didn’t experience a heart attack, but it was imminent. Thankfully, the heart muscle was fine and there was no damage. But I had to make some significant lifestyle changes.

I Had to Face Reality

I gave up soft drinks, desserts and fried foods. Every day was a battle. I cut back on the carbs that were elevating my triglycerides and blocking my arteries. Potatoes, rice, breads—these were the foods I loved.

Heart DiseaseBut I had to face reality. I wanted to be around for more than one tomorrow.

I studied a lot of articles at the American Heart Association website, on how to improve my overall health and make better food choices. Their suggested workout routines were helpful, too.

These past 10 years, working at a health care administration company has reinforced my desire to live healthier. I’ve lost 20 pounds. I still work out 5 days a week, doing weights and cardio.

Living Up to the Gift of Life

Heart Disease

“Pooches on Parade” at Heart Walk

This November 11, my company is partnering with Wake Forest Baptist HealthNovant Health, Cook Medical and many others* to sponsor the Winston-Salem Heart & Stroke Walk. The “Pooches on Parade,” special honoring of heart disease survivors and veterans, live band and healthy food trucks make this a really fun morning.

Best of all, every person has a chance to walk one, two or four miles to strengthen your heart.

Activities begin at 8:30 am at Bailey Park downtown in Wake Forest Innovation Quarter.

I’ve lost several friends to heart issues. So it’s always on my mind to make good choices.

God has blessed me this past 10 years. I want to live up to the gift of life.

 

*Allegacy Federal Credit Union, BB&T, Corning, Dixon Hughes, Hanesbrands Inc., Inmar, Kimpton, Piedmont Federal Savings Bank, Stimmel, Truliant Federal Credit Union, Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, Winston-Salem Journal, 99.5 WMAG, WXII-12 and other sponsors.

 

2017 Employer-based Premiums Contrast with ACA Increases

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News

2017 employer-based premiums

Family health insurance premiums rose an average 3% this year for people getting coverage through the workplace, the sixth consecutive year of small increases, according to a study released Tuesday.

Average 2017 Family Premiums: $18,764

The average total cost of family premiums was $18,764 for 2017, according to a survey of employers by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research & Educational Trust. That cost is generally divided between the employer and workers. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

2017 employer-based premiumsWhile overall premium increases remain modest, workers are picking up a greater portion of the tab — this year $5,714 for family coverage, about a third of total cost.

Employer-provided coverage for a single person rose on average 4%, to $6,690. Those individuals pay $1,213 on average.

Still, the employer market looks remarkably stable compared to the price increases seen in the Affordable Care Act’s insurance marketplaces for people who buy their own coverage. Premiums on those plans spiked on average about 20% this year, and many insurers dropped out because of financial concerns.

Average ACA Premiums Up 20% in 2017

For all the media attention and political wrangling over the Obamacare exchanges, their share of the market is relatively small. They provide coverage to 10 million Americans while 151 million Americans get health insurance through their employer.

The continued slow rise of employer health premiums identified in the Kaiser survey surprised some analysts who have expected the trend to end as the economy picked up steam, leading to a jump in use of health services and health costs.

Drew Altman, CEO of the Kaiser Family Foundation, said it’s “health care’s greatest mystery” why health insurance costs have continued their slow pace even as the economy has picked up the past few years. “We can’t explain it.”

2017 employer-based premiums

Employee Deductibles Have Nearly Doubled Since 2010

Another unexpected result was that workers’ deductibles — the health bills that workers must pay before their insurance coverage kicks in — remained stable this year at $1,221. Since 2010, as companies sought to keep premiums in check, deductibles have nearly doubled. Higher deductibles can limit premium increases because costs are shifted to workers and it gives them greater incentive to cut spending.

“Increasing deductibles has been a main strategy of employers to keep premiums down and we will have to watch if this plateauing is a one time thing … or if this portends a sharper increase in premiums in future years,” said Altman. “It could be deductibles are reaching their natural limit or could be the tighter l2017 employer-based premiumsabor market” that’s causing employers to back off, he added.

Meanwhile, a second employer survey released Monday by Mercer, a benefits consulting firm, suggests a modest increase in health costs coming next year, too. Employers said they expect their health costs to increase by an average 4.3% in 2018, according to the survey.

To deal with higher medical costs — notably big increases in the prices of prescription drugs — employers are using multiple strategies, including continuing to shift more costs to workers and paying doctors and hospitals based on the value of the services rather than just quantity of services.

Jeff Levin-Scherz, a health policy expert with benefits consultant Willis Towers Watson, said there is a limit on how much employers can shift costs to their workers, particularly in a tight labor market. “Single-digit increases doesn’t mean health care costs are no longer a concern for employers,” he said.

Trend: Employer-Based Coverage Has Dropped

The 19th annual Kaiser survey also found that the proportion of employers offering health coverage remained stable last year at 53%. But the numbers have fallen over the past t2017 employer-based premiumswo decades.

The survey highlights that the amount workers pay can vary dramatically by employer size. Workers in small firms — those with fewer than 200 employees — pay on average $1,550 more annually for family premiums than those at large firms. The gap occurs because small firms are much more likely than large ones to contribute the same dollar amount toward a worker’s health benefits whether they’re enrolled in individual or family coverage.

More than one-third of workers at small employers pay at least half the total premium, compared with 8% at large employers.

That’s the case at Gale Nurseries in Gwynedd Valley, Pa., where health insurance costs rose 7.5% this year. Its 25 workers are paying nearly half the cost of the premium — at least $45 a week for those who choose the base coverage plan. Employees also have deductibles ranging from $1,000 to $2,500.

A decade ago, the nursery paid the full cost of the premium.

“It’s crazy — we keep paying more and getting less,” said comptroller Candy Koons.

At the Westport (Conn.) Weston Family YMCA, health insurance premiums rose about 7% this year, leaving its 50 full-time employees to pay a $156 premium for individual coverage.

“It’s not problematic, but it’s one of our bigger costs associated with payroll,” said Joe Query, the human resources director.

 

Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Too Few Patients Follow The Adage: You Better Shop Around

By Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health News

shop medical costs

Despite having more financial “skin in the game” than ever, many consumers don’t make any attempt to compare prices for health care services, a newly released study found.

In a survey of nearly 3,000 adults younger than 65, about half of the roughly 1,900 who said they spent money on medical care in the previous year reported that they knew in advance what their costs would be. Of those who didn’t anticipate how much they would owe before receiving care, only 13 percent said they tried to predict their out-of-pocket expenses. An even smaller proportion, 3 percent, compared prices from multiple providers ahead of time.

It wasn’t that survey respondents were ignorant of price differences or didn’t care about them. More than 90 percent said they believed that prices vary greatly among providers, and 71 percent said that the amount they spent out-of-pocket was important or very important when choosing a doctor.

Yet most respondents said they didn’t comparison shop or even ask how much they would owe in copayments or other cost-sharing expenses before they turned up for an appointment.

Researchers conducted the online survey in February and March of 2015, dividing respondents into three groups: uninsured, insured in a plan with an annual deductible higher than $1,250 for single coverage or $2,500 for family coverage, or insured in a plan with a lower deductible or no deductible. The results were published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Three-quarters of the study participants said they did not know of any resource that would allow them to compare costs, while half said that if a website showing such information were available, they would use it.

“If price shopping is an important policy goal, it will be necessary to increase the availability of information on price and decrease the complexity of accessing the information,” the researchers wrote. They noted that patients trying to figure out pricing information and their share of the cost must often know specific procedures’ billing codes, the difference between professional fees and facility fees, and the details of how their insurance plan is structured.

“Our results emphasize that simply passing price transparency laws or regulations (as over half of states have done) appears insufficient to facilitate price shopping,” they added.

Most respondents said they did not think there was a relationship between lower cost and lower quality.

shop medical costsOne reason for the lack of shopping activity may be that consumers value the ongoing relationship they have with an existing doctor and don’t want to disrupt that, said Neeraj Sood, professor of public policy at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and one of the study’s authors.

Another possible explanation is that despite efforts by states, employers and insurers to make price information readily available, shopping for health care services is nowhere near as user-friendly and intuitive as buying something on Amazon or Expedia.

“Maybe right now these tools are so primitive that even though there is a financial incentive to shop, people aren’t doing it,” Sood said.

People surveyed were most likely to search out prices before going to a retail or urgent care clinic compared with other care facilities. Consumers who received physical therapy or lab and imaging services were more likely than others to comparison shop for providers, the survey found.

 

Please visit khn.org/columnists to send comments or ideas for future topics for the Insuring Your Health column. Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

How Employer Plans Cover Prescription Drugs (Infographic)

An estimated 150 million Americans have employer-sponsored health insurance.[i] What is the complex system under which employer health plans cover the rocketing costs of prescription drugs?

employer prescription drugs

Members

Individuals covered by employer’s health plan. May pay premiums or copays for drug coverage.

Employer or Insurer

Employer or insurer pays PBM to develop preferred drug pricing & process prescription claims. PBM returns some or all rebates to employer or insurer.

Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM)

Negotiates discounts and rebates from manufacturer. Contracts with pharmacy.

Manufacturer

Negotiates rebates with PBM.
Sells discounted drugs to wholesaler from core price.

Wholesaler

Negotiates price with pharmacy.

Pharmacy

Pharmacy dispenses to members & collects copays.

For more resources, view: ”10 Pharmacy Terms Employers Need to Know” and “5 Factors in Employer Prescription Drug Costs” from Pharmacist Zafeira Sarrimanolis.MedCost

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[i Robert Galvin and Troyen Brennan, “Can Employers Take a Bigger Role in Controlling Drug Costs?” Health Affairs blog, February 17, 2017, http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2017/02/17/can-employers-take-a-bigger-role-in-controlling-drug-costs/ (accessed April 6, 2017).

 

IRS Reposts Revised Form 720 for PCORI Fee: Deadline 7/30/17

Michael BerwangerBy Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The IRS recently reposted the April 2017 version of Form 720 (Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return) on its website.* While the form’s primary purpose is to serve as the quarterly return for various federal excise taxes, it also is used to report PCORI fees imposed under health care reform. (For more information on PCORI, see  “PCORI Fee for Self-Funded Employers”.)

Please note, the portion of the form related to the PCORI fees is unaffected. While Form 720 is filed quarterly for other federal excise taxes, the PCORI fee reporting and payment are only required annually, by July 31 of the year following the calendar year in which the applicable policy or plan year ended. The change noted at the beginning of the form is related to the excise taxes.

IRS form 720As background, PCORI fees, used to fund research on patient-centered outcomes, apply to plan and policy years ending before October 1, 2019. They are payable by insurers and sponsors of self-insured health plans, and are calculated by multiplying the applicable dollar amount for the year by the average number of covered lives. As announced in IRS Notice 2016-64, the fees owed in 2017 are as follows:

  • For plan years** ending on or after October 1, 2015, and before October 1, 2016: $2.17 per covered life
  • For plan years** ending on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017: $2.26 per covered life

If you have already filed and used the form posted prior to the most recent update, please contact a tax professional on whether refiling is necessary.MedCost

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*If you downloaded the Form 720 (Rev. April 2017) before July 3, 2017, please note that
on page 2, under IRS No. 33, the rate is corrected to 12% of the sales price, not 12%
of the sales tax.)

*’*Plan year’ is generally the 12-month period stated in the Summary Plan Description, or for plans filing a Form 5500, the plan year stated in that filing. NOTE: The plan year may be different from the benefit year or the renewal period.

______________________________________________________________________________

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

Controlling Specialty Drug Costs (Video)

Specialty Drug Costs Can Be Managed with These Strategies
specialty drug costs

WATCH VIDEO NOW

“It’s interesting that a lot of these specialty drugs are designed for a very small percentage of the population that have a certain disease state,” said Michael Cornwell, MedCost Director of Sales and Underwriting.

“There may be less than 200,000-300,000 people in the country that need that particular drug. That’s one of the reasons specialty drugs are so expensive.”

MedCost Pharmacist Zafeira Sarrimanolis agrees. “It’s an exciting time in the drug manufacturing world, because all of these new medications have been coming out over the past ten years or so for medical conditions that really weren’t treatable before.

“For example, hepatitis C medications previously were not very effective and really hard for patients to tolerate. Now we have new medications on the market that are practically a 100% cure rate for patients.

specialty drug costsThese drugs are also a lot easier for them to take and tolerate. Part of the problem with that is the price tag on some of those new medications.”

“One of the largest reasons people are readmitted to the hospital is because they don’t adhere to the medication,” said Michael Cornwell. “Programs like step therapy ask you to try a clinically appropriate drug before you try a similar but more expensive one.

Prior authorizations probe a physician’s reasoning behind prescription choices. A lot of these specialty drugs are really for a pretty small percentage of the population. So when you look at a population as a whole, the people taking those drugs are usually between 1%-1½% of your population. That’s the good news.

“The bad news is they’re very expensive. Probably the biggest growth area in the specialty arenas are the cancer drugs. There’s a whole pipeline of new cancer treatments hitting the marketplace. But in that pipeline, member education and aid in helping and consulting is a good thing too. It allows us to have some personal outreach try to help these people manage their disease state.MedCost

(This post is a transcript from the video, CONTROLLING SPECIALTY DRUG COSTS.”)

 

PCORI Fee for Self-Funded Employers: Due July 2017

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

 PCORI Required by ACA

PCORI due datesThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes provisions to promote research by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) that will provide information on the relative strengths and weaknesses of various medical interventions. This initiative is being funded by a tax that must be paid by insurers and plan sponsors of self-funded health plans. Per IRS Guidance, for self-insured and/or self-funded plans ending in 2016, filing and payment must be submitted to the IRS by July 31, 2017. The fees owed in 2017 are as follows:

  • For plan years* ending on or after October 1, 2015, and before October 1, 2016: $2.17 per covered life
  • For plan years* ending on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017: $2.26 per covered life

*’Plan year’ is generally the 12-month period stated in the Summary Plan Description, or for plans filing a Form 5500, the plan year stated in that filing. NOTE: The plan year may be different from the benefit year or the renewal period.

 PCORI Fee Payments

PCORI due dateUnder the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) final rule, plan sponsors are responsible for paying the fee, which is treated as an excise tax by the IRS. A Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return (Form 720) must be used when reporting liability for the fee. The form can be accessed at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f720.pdf. Instructions for completing and filing the form can be accessed at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i720.pdf. Completion of the form is relatively simple.  As described here, only the relevant parts of the form need to be completed, which include:

  • Identifying information at the beginning of the form
  • Part II, line 133 (“Applicable self-insured plans” line)
  • Part III, items 3 and 10
  • The signature section
  • The voucher form, if the form is mailed
  • The form may be filed electronically or mailed to:

Department of the Treasury
Internal Revenue Service
Cincinnati, OH 45999-0009

Additional Tips

The following information may be helpful in determining your tax obligation under the PCORI provision:

  • The plan sponsor must apply a single calculation method in determining the average number of lives covered under the plan for the entire plan year. However, the plan sponsor is not required to use the same method from one plan year to the next.
  • HRA and Self-Insured Plans: A self-insured Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) is not subject to a separate fee if the HRA is integrated with another applicable self-insured health plan that provides major medical coverage. The HRA and the other plan must be established or maintained by the same plan sponsor with the same plan year.
    • However, if a self-insured HRA is integrated with an insured group health plan, then the fee must be paid for both the self-insured product and the insured product.
  • Excepted Benefits: Excepted benefits (as defined under section 9832c of the U.S. Code) are exempt from the fee, as is a health Flexible Spending Account (FSA) that satisfies the requirements of an excepted benefit.
  • All plans that provide medical coverage to employees owe this fee. The insurer/carrier for fully-insured plans will pay the fee (typically, the fee is passed on to the plan). The plan sponsor for self-funded plans will pay the fee. Note, there is no exception for small employers, government, church or not-for-profit plans, nor for grandfathered plans or union plans. The fee is tax-deductible.
  • For more information, see: IRS FAQ or IRS chart that shows which plans owe the fee.

NOTE: MedCost is not a tax preparation company, and you may have additional tax obligations for other benefit plans that you offer to your employees. Please consult with your tax advisor for guidance. This blog post should not be considered as tax or legal advice.MedCost

 

2018 HSA and HDHP Dollar Limits Released by IRS

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The IRS has released Revenue Procedure 2017-37, setting the 2018 dollar limitations for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans (HDHPs).

The contribution, deductible and out-of-pocket limitations for 2018 are shown in the table below. All of these amounts are scheduled to increase from 2017. (The 2017 limits are included for reference.)

2018 HSA HDHP

For guidance on HSAs, please review the IRS frequently asked questions’ page at https://www.irs.gov/publications/p969/ar02.html.MedCost

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

 

Prescription Insurance: Why Are Costs Rising?

MedCost pharmacistBy Zafeira Sarrimanolis, PharmD, MedCost Clinical Consultant

Prescription insurance has become an increasingly major cost for employers. New drug approvals by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are expected to escalate this year with multiple innovative drugs already being approved for cancer, multiple sclerosis and other conditions.

As researchers discover more treatments, costs will continue to climb. For this reason, smart management of pharmacy plans will be even more vital for employer health plans.

2017 Drug Pipeline

2016 saw a below average number of drug approvals. 2017 is expected to bounce back with 30+ new specialty drugs.

Specialty medications are high-cost prescription drugs used to treat complex conditions. The blue bar (below) shows specialty medication drug approvals. The green bar represents traditional brand and generic drugs. Technology, innovation and new scientific discoveries have caused specialty medication drug approvals to rapidly increase over the last few years.

prescription insurance

Growth of Novel Drugs in Prescription Insurance

In 2016, 22 novel drugs were approved, which was the lowest number since 2010. A novel drug is an innovative product with a unique chemical structure that has never been approved by the FDA before.  Typically novel drugs meet an unmet medical need.

prescription insurance As of May 5th, 20 novel drugs have already been approved this year. It’s an exciting time for healthcare as we treat more complex conditions and improve member health and quality of life.

But it comes at a cost – literally.

 

Summary

When 1% of prescriptions drive 40-45% of an employer’s pharmacy spend, avoiding wise management is no longer optional. Part of my role as a MedCost Pharmacist is to emphasize the importance of cost-management strategies to our employers and consultants.

prescription insurance

I also work closely with our clients to help employers understand the importance of educating their employees about these changes and why they are needed.

It’s all about making sure each employee gets the right drug for the right medical condition at the right time. That’s how we control pharmacy costs.MedCost


Sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Factors in Employer Prescription Drug Costs

Why are employer prescription drug costs spiraling higher every year?

“There are a combination of factors,” said Zafeira Sarrimanolis, PharmD, MedCost Pharmacist and Clinical Consultant. “This is a major problem for employers who do not want to make employees unhappy by instituting clinical pharmacy programs in their health plans.”

employer prescription drug costs


What Are the Factors in Employer Prescription Drug Costs?

  1. Manufacturer Price Hikes.

    Costs for drugs like EpiPen® and Humira® have been widely publicized.[i] Prices are escalating 16-17% per year. Manufacturers are also promoting new uses for existing high-cost drugs, even though there are already FDA-approved, lower-priced drugs for the same conditions already on the market.

  2. Increased Use of Prescription Drugs.

    The number of people taking cholesterol drugs is up from 6.5% (1999-2002) to 13.1% (2009-2012). Similar increases are seen in other common chronic conditions, including depression which increased 6.4% to 9.0% over the same period.[ii]

employer prescription drug costs

 

3.Specialty Drugs.

New, expensive medications for diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis are constantly hitting the market. Specialty drugs account for about 1% of total prescriptions but 35-45% of pharmacy spend, averaging $3,400 per drug per month.[iii]

4. Patent Expirations.

In 2016, Crestor, Zetia and Benicar all had patent expirations. The increased competition from generic equivalent drugs is decreasing costs across the board. Unfortunately for high-cost injectable medications like Humira, the introduction of generic versions is not as simple.

5. Advertising.

An estimated 80 drug commercials per hour are shown across TV outlets.employer prescription drug costs[iv] Radio, magazines, newspapers and social media also contain prescription drug ads that prompt individuals to ask doctors about specific drugs.

It’s an exciting time in the drug industry with the influx of new drugs coming on the market,” said Michael Cornwell, MedCost Director of Sales and Underwriting. “But it also presents challenges for us in the industry since controlling these costs is not always user-friendly.”

 

Employer Strategies for Controlling Prescription Drug Costs

 

Pharmacy Benefit Managers

Working with a Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM) supports cost management for employers in the pharmacy portion of their health plans. A PBM negotiates discounts and rebates from drug manufacturers, which are then returned back to the employer. PBMs also contract with pharmacies and process pharmacy claims.

The PBM controls pharmacy costs for employers through development of a preferred drug list (or formulary) and clinical programs. MedCost as a benefits administrator works closely with PBM partners to get the best rates for employers, customizing a pharmacy plan for each client’s unique population.

Formulary Management

Preferred drug lists are arranged in tiers, or cost levels, of generic, preferred and non-preferred medications. A PBM Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee of industry experts follows a clinically-driven formulary decision-making process to define the preferred drug list. Some drugs are excluded from coverage in favor of clinically-similar alternatives that treat the same disease.

Exclusions can save as much as 15% of prescription drug costs in an employer’s health plan.

Prior Authorization

Prior authorizations require a doctor to provide additional clinical information to determine whether the health plan covers that drug. Employees, providers and health plan administrators dislike the inconvenience of waiting for approval of drugs. But this strategy is key to ensure that members take safe, clinically-appropriate and cost-effective drugs.

“There’s a human factor,” said Michael Cornwell. “We do not want to be disrupted in using familiar medicines. But employers cannot save money without these strategies.”

Step Therapy

Step therapy requires initial use of a lower-cost, clinically-similar drug for a medical condition, before a higher-cost drug for the same condition is covered by a health plan.

Summary

When 1% of prescriptions drive 40-45% of an employer’s pharmacy spend, avoiding wise management is no longer optional”, said Zafeira Sarrimanolis. “Part of my role as a MedCost Pharmacist is to emphasize the importance of cost-management strategies to our employers and consultants.”

“I also work closely with our clients to help employers understand the importance of educating their employees about these changes and why they are needed.”

“It’s all about making sure each employee gets the right drug for the right medical condition at the right time. That’s how we control pharmacy costs.MedCost

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[i] Brad Tuttle, “21 Incredibly Disturbing Facts about High Prescription Drug Prices,” Money Magazine, June 22, 2016, http://time.com/money/4377304/high-prescription-drug-prices-facts/ (accessed April 26, 2017).

[ii] “Health, United States, 2015,” National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,   https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf#079 (2009-2012), (accessed April 26, 2017).

[iii] “The Growing Cost of Specialty Pharmacy – Is It Sustainable?” American Journal of Managed Care, February 18, 2013, http://www.ajmc.com/payer-perspectives/0213/the-growing-cost-of-specialty-pharmacyis-it-sustainable (accessed April 26, 2017).

[iv] “Prescription Drug Costs Remain Atop the Public’s National Health Care Agenda,” Kaiser Family Foundation, October 28, 2015, http://kff.org/health-costs/press-release/prescription-drug-costs-remain-atop-the-publics-national-health-care-agenda-well-ahead-of-affordable-care-act-revisions-and-repeal/ (accessed April 26, 2017).