Listening to the Voice of the Customer

Health care is complex. It always has been — even more so today in a continually changing industry and environment. MedCost strives to be the kind of partner that helps our customers navigate, translate and adapt to those changes.

When MedCost started as a small company, we were still using some of the principles we use today. We were sitting down and listening to the unique needs of the customer. We were using data even before there were sophisticated mechanisms to use data. To understand what was driving their costs, what providers they were utilizing, how we can essentially customize some sort of solution, whether it be a product, a program or a service to essentially help them better manage or to achieve what they were trying to achieve with their health plan.

In this time, in this industry, collaboration is more important than ever. We have a legal team, a communications team, a pharmacist, an underwriting team — all designed to essentially help support the employers, and bring some of the best new ideas to the employer to help them engage in new or better health and wellness programs. And also to drive lower costs for their population.

We essentially try to be one single source for an employer to come and partner with them — to not only design but to administer their health plans.

We’re interested in your unique needs. Contact Jason at jclarke@medcost.com or call 336.774.4283.MedCost

(This post is a transcript from the video, “Listening to the Voice of the Customer.” )

Self-Funded vs. Fully-Insured Health Plans (Infographic)

Why are more employers choosing self-funded versus fully-insured health plans? This infographic compares the fixed costs of self-funded employer plans, with potential savings available from health dollars not spent by the company.

In the event that an employer’s claims are larger than projected, stop-loss insurance that is purchased protects business assets.

Self-Funded vs. Fully-Insured

This short video, “Reasons to Consider Self-Funding,” gives four key reasons that over 58% of US employees are enrolled in self-funded health plans. Evaluate these reasons to see what is best for your business.MedCost

(To print this infographic, click on the title and scroll to “PRINT THIS PAGE” at the bottom)

7 Ways to Manage Medical Cost for Employers (Infographic)

medical cost

*Discover more resources about MedCost Care Management programs hereOr browse through seven ways to manage medical cost:

  1. Complex Case Management 
  2. Inpatient Management
  3. Outpatient Management
  4. Telehealth Services
  5. Nurse Health Coaching
  6. Maternity Management
  7. Behavioral Health

To print this infographic, click on the title and scroll to “PRINT THIS PAGE” at the bottom.MedCost

President Trump Orders Pull-Back on ACA

ACA changesBy Brad Roehrenbeck, General Counsel & VP, Legal Services, Compliance

As widely reported over the weekend, within a few hours of his swearing in, President Donald Trump signed his first Executive Order, calling on federal agencies to take immediate steps to curtail aspects of the Affordable Care Act and signaling the new administration’s plans to repeal and replace the Act altogether.

What does the Order say?

The Order itself has little if any tangible impact on the law. The Order states the administration’s official policy of pursuing a complete repeal and replacement of the ACA. It directs the heads of all federal agencies to take steps within their authority to remove or minimize any provision of the ACA that carries fiscal or regulatory burden. As the primary agencies charged with implementing the ACA, that action will likely come from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor, and the IRS. The order also directs these agencies to afford greater flexibility to the States in areas impacted by the law. Finally, the order directs federal agencies to take steps to encourage and enable an interstate market for health coverage.

What does the Order mean for employers?

For now, the Order has no real impact on employers, except to signal that federal agencies will be acting quickly to relax various components of the ACA that impact employers, group health plans, and their members. The Senate has yet to confirm those President Trump has nominated to lead the agencies affected by the Order. Once those agency heads are confirmed, we expect to see regulations issued as prescribed by the Order and will be watching closely. Of course, both the Trump administration and members of both houses are said to be working on legislation to repeal and/or replace the ACA. Both the House and the Senate have laid the groundwork for streamlined procedures for repeal of the Act. They face more of an uphill battle to pass legislation to replace the ACA, as a 60-vote majority will be required in the Senate to pass replacement legislation. We will provide updates as details of those efforts become public. Until such legislation passes or further regulations are released, employers should bear in mind that the ACA remains in full force and effect.MedCost

Fully-Insured vs. Self-Funded Health Plans (Infographic)

Has your company examined the differences between fully-insured versus self-funded health plans? Check out this infographic to see why more employers are choosing self-funded plans.

fully-insured versus self-funded health plans

To print this article, click on the title and scroll to “PRINT THIS PAGE” at the bottom.

IRS Announces 2017 FSA Limits

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The Internal Revenue Service recently announced the tax year 2017 annual inflation adjustments for more than 50 tax provisions.

Notably, for the first time in two years and consistent with industry expectations, the IRS has increased the dollar limitation under § 125(i) on voluntary employee salary reductions for contributions to health Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA) from $2,550 to $2,600.

The Revenue Procedure 2016-55 provides details about these annual adjustments. The tax year 2017 adjustments generally are used on tax returns filed in 2018.

2017 FSA

 

 

 

For guidance on FSAs, please review the IRS Frequently Asked Questions page.

 

To print this article, click on the title and scroll to “PRINT THIS PAGE” at the bottom.

5 More Tips for a Smooth Open Enrollment

open enrollmentDoes open enrollment for your Human Resources department seem like “Nightmare on Employment Street?” Our first post listed five practical tips to streamline the open enrollment period for annual benefits. Check out these five additional best practices to chase the confusion away:

 1. Make sure you provide all of the data requested by your claims administrator.

Inaccurate or incomplete data can result in time-consuming, frustrating mistakes. Remember to enter information exactly as provided in previous enrollments. Unique and accurate identifying information must be entered for each dependent.

 2. Collect waiver forms from your employees.

For ACA reporting and Department of Labor requirements, you as the employer need to keep proof of waived coverage on file. Here is a Compliance Assistance Guide from the U. S. Department of Labor that offers more information. MedCost provides our clients with a generic form as part of our benefits’ services, if clients do not have one.

3. If you submit updated enrollment data on paper forms or by spreadsheet, information on new hires, changes, and terminations is all that is needed.

It may seem counterintuitive, but full enrollment data is not required and can actually slow down the input process for your claims administrator.

Note: This does not apply to clients that electronically submit enrollment data via 834 transaction. 

4. When open enrollment is over, it’s over—no extensions.

health insurance noticesStick with the open enrollment deadline you set. Announce the deadline and remind employees of it several times during the open enrollment period. It is then the employees’ responsibility to complete the required enrollment process by the deadline. Remember, open enrollment is a finite time period, not an ongoing process.

5. Once you’ve collected enrollment data, submit it all at one time.

Submitting information piecemeal or in multiple spreadsheets that have to be merged or compared to previous submissions only increases the chance for errors. Avoid confusion with one complete submission of enrollment data.

Don’t let your open enrollment become a nightmare. Competent claims administrators can help advise you of all compliance requirements and deadlines. And turn your nightmares into sweet dreams.MedCost

Got Employees? 5 Tips for a Smooth Open Enrollment

open enrollmentIt’s that time of the year that presents headaches for HR professionals and admin staff—open enrollment. But your company’s benefits administration doesn’t have to resemble a Halloween Fright Night. Here are five best practices to streamline your employees’ enrollment period and leave you with a basket of sweet candy:

1. Create a realistic schedule for open enrollment by beginning with the end in mind.

Your open enrollment period should end no later than 30 days prior to the end of your plan year or renewal date. Once you determine the ending date of open enrollment, back up from there to schedule open enrollment meetings, print forms or materials, distribute or mail open enrollment packets, etc.

2. Collect all required information for each plan participant (employee or dependent).

This may include information for each plan participant such as:

  •  Last Name, First Name and Middle Initial (exactly as provided in previous enrollments)
  •  Social Security Number (unique and accurate identifying information for each dependent)
  •  Address
  •  Date of Birth (unique and accurate identifying information for each dependent)
  •  Gender
  •  Hire Date (if an employee)
  •  Coverage Effective Date
  •  Product Coverage (Medical, Dental, Flex)
  •  Date of Termination, if applicable, and Reason for Term
       (especially needed for COBRA)
  •  E-mail address (useful to promote programs and services available through benefits plan)

3. Remind employees that “good data in equals good data out.”

open enrollmentStress the importance of completing all fields on any enrollment or waiver forms. It’s in every plan participant’s best interest to review and verify new and existing data during open enrollment since it directly affects coverage for the upcoming plan year. Decisions regarding participants’ eligibility and coverage under the health plan—as well as that of their dependents—are made based on the information provided during open enrollment.

4. Educate employees about the “not-so-flexible” guidelines of flexible spending accounts (FSAs), if available through your plan.

In addition to the advantages of flexible spending accounts, make sure your employees also know about the guidelines for FSAs. The most important thing for employees to remember is that FSAs are “use it or lose it” accounts. Contributions made to an FSA during a calendar year can be used only for eligible expenses incurred during the same year—unless your plan provides for either a grace period or a carryover. If your plan doesn’t provide for a carryover, employees need to be aware that any money remaining in an FSA account after the claim filing period at the end of the year (and after the grace period, if applicable) is forfeited in accordance with IRS regulations.

5. If your employees have flex debit cards, remind them to save all receipts for purchases made with the card.

open enrollmentSince a flex debit card deducts payment for an eligible health care expense directly from an FSA account, employees may think that saving health care receipts is unnecessary. Some claims for reimbursement, however, may require substantiation. Encourage employees to save all receipts for flex debit card purchases in case they receive a substantiation request or their tax return is audited by the IRS. Employees should hold on to their cards even if the allocated FSA total amount has already been used.

Our next blog will contain five more tips to plan and prepare for open enrollment like a pro. Subscribe to our blog to receive it automatically!*

 

*To sign up for the blog, go to the left margin under “STAY UP TO DATE.” The only requirement is your email address. 

 

It’s Time to Plan ACA Reinsurance Payments

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

 

shutterstock_68891791It is time for employer-sponsored health plans to begin thinking about the process for calculation and submission of enrollment data and payment of fees under the Transitional Reinsurance Program.

As background, this program was established to fund a reinsurance pool to help stabilize premiums in the insurance markets created under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The program is being funded by three annual assessments on employer-sponsored health plans. The assessments are for average covered lives in 2014, 2015 and 2016 calendar years.

This year, enrollment data must be submitted by November 15, 2016, and payment must be submitted no later than January 17, 2017.

The 2016 Reinsurance Contribution Rate is $27.00 per covered life.

Online Submission Process

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has implemented a streamlined process for reinsurancethe collection of reinsurance contributions. A contributing entity, or a Third Party Administrator (TPA) on its behalf, can complete all required steps for the reinsurance contributions process online (using the government portal, pay.gov), including registration, submission of annual enrollment count, and remittance of contributions.

A form is available for the contributing entity (or its TPA) to provide basic company and contact information and the annual enrollment count for the applicable year. The form will automatically calculate the contribution amounts, and entities will be required to submit payment information and schedule a payment date for remittance of the contributions.

CMS will not send an invoice to contributing entities. All required action will be completed online at pay.gov.

Options for Payment

There are two options for how a contributing entity can make a payment: (1) a one-time lump sum payment, or (2) a full contribution in two payments. (See chart below.)

Contribution Payment Options for the 2016 Benefit Year

Reinsurance

Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

CMS will permit contributing entities to submit each year’s contribution in two separate payments – one larger payment of $21.60 per covered life at the start of the year, and a smaller payment of $5.40 per covered life at the end of the year.

However, when submitting enrollment data, dates must immediately be scheduled for payment of the fees, whether there will be one payment prior to January 17, 2017, or two payments with the later in November 2017.

If You Are Self-funded for a Portion of the Reporting Period

health insurance noticesFor a plan that has moved from a fully insured plan to a self-funded plan during the first nine months of the 2016 calendar year, both plans will be responsible for paying a portion of the fee, using one of the permitted calculation methods.

Since fully-insured plans are not permitted to use the Snapshot Factor Method of calculation, either the Actual Count Method or the Snapshot Method of calculation must be used.

Helpful Resources

This site provides technical assistance and training related to the Marketplace and Premium Stabilization program (which includes the Transitional Reinsurance Program). Webinars are offered that provide entities with information on program and operational guidance, along with live demos of the enrollment count and contributions submission process.

This is the site where the contributing entity, or TPA, will create a profile, and submit the enrollment data and contributions for the Transitional Reinsurance Program.

This website is hosted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to provide information about the Transitional Reinsurance Program.

For more information, consult your broker, legal advisor or cms.gov. MedCost

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

 

To print this article, click on the title and scroll to “PRINT THIS PAGE” at the bottom.