Four Corporate Ideas for Employee Wellness Programs

Stories of Success

If you’re one of the 80% of employers who have offered employee wellness programs and information,[i] you may be searching to see what is working at other companies. Developing a culture of wellness can decrease sick leave absenteeism by an average 28%, and workers’ compensation and disability costs by an average 30%.[ii]

employee wellness programs

How can you increase your employees’ job satisfaction and overall health, while saving hard-earned health care dollars? Here are four power ideas for more successful employee wellness programs

1. Offer Choices.

One size does not fit all in employee wellness programs,” said Crystal Spicer, MedCost Human Resources Manager. As a company offering financial and health solutions for employer benefit programs, clients were asking what wellness outreach MedCost was doing for their own employees.

The MedCost HR team realized that what worked for one employee didn’t necessarily fit another. So the company’s wellness committee designed a point-based program with multiple ways to boost health and earn financial incentives.

The annual program, kicked off in 2016, measured points earned for employee wellness activities on a quarterly and a yearly basis. This chart shows multiple ways that MedCost employees could earn points for the financial incentives at year’s end:

employee wellness programs

“We got people’s attention, which is what we were striving for,” said Crystal. One group of women came to work an hour early to walk together – even climbing stairs.

A Weight Watchers group cosponsored by the company attracted 20 people. Sherry lost 56 pounds. Glenn lost 36. Trish, motivated on her own, lost 40. And their new habits of exercising and eating helped them keep it off.

MedCost offered $100 drawings quarterly for those who met point goals. At the end of 2016, those who accrued the 2,400 points will receive a $500 contribution into their personal Health Savings Account.[iii] Employees enrolled in a Preferred Provider Organization plan could earn a gift card for $250.

Fitness classes offered after work onsite were another way to add points. The company shared costs with employees who signed up for the six-week classes. From the beginning, classes were well-attended.

Financial incentives are effective for successful employee wellness programs. Four out of five employers use financial incentives to promote wellness.[iv]

“Getting buy-in is key,” said Crystal. “Earning these financial incentives are obtainable because there are a whole variety of ways to get there.

2. Incorporate Employee Suggestions

employee wellness programs

Figure 1. Several MedCost employees at the 2016 Heart Walk

Our annual support of the Triad American Heart Association’s walk hit new levels this year – and not just financially. Jenny implemented a leadership contest to raise the most employee contributions, with the winner earning the right to wear this Southern Lady hat, red beads and tutu (See Figure 1).

Brad (in the lovely hat and tutu) definitely stood out in the crowd of 7,500 walkers through downtown Winston-Salem.

But even better were the 125 employees, family members and friends who walked between one to four miles on October 29th. Dogs, babies in strollers, music and laughter made this emphasis on healthy hearts a lot of fun.

Another employee suggestion resulted in a weekly “Walk with Me Wednesday” event, beginning in 2015. MedCost is located in a business park with sidewalks, gazebos and ponds. An average six to eight employees walk 15 minutes together at noon, enjoying fresh air, camaraderie and exercise in a beautifully landscaped setting.

employee wellness programs

Figure 2. MedCost on Kimel Park Drive, Winston-Salem, NC

One key benefit of this weekly walk is better connectivity among the employees who walk together. In many businesses, department knowledge is often siloed from other departments because of different functions. And employees don’t get to know each other.

“The walks really do benefit the mind as well as the body,” said Karen, a 16-year employee at MedCost. “Walking with others just motivates me to get out and walk.”

 

3. Take a Long-Term Approach to Your Return on Investment (ROI)

“Looking purely at hard costs, healthcare spending can be one of the largest single expenses for a business, next to payroll,” said Dan Birach, president of HEALTHWORKS division at Carolinas HealthCare System. [v]

“Statistics show that for every dollar an employer invested in areas such as wellness programming and disease management, they enjoyed an ROI of anywhere from $1.50 to $3.80. Healthy employees are more productive and miss fewer days.”

The Society for Human Resource Management reported that 80% of employers offered preventive wellness services and info in 2015.[vi]

Employee wellness programs are having an impact on reduced dollars spent on health benefits. When corporate wellness programs were implemented:

  • Claims costs reduced 28%
  • Doctor visits reduced 17%
  • Hospital admissions reduced 63%
  • Disability costs were down 34%
  • Incidence of injury reduced 25%[vii]

“A wellness program can make just a small difference at first,” said Crystal. “It has to build gradually.”

Employers offering wellness programs are looking for the same key ingredient for their employees – motivation.

4. Motivate Your Employees for Better Quality of Life

employee wellness programs

Figure 3. Claudia Johnson before losing weight

Claudia works with providers (hospital systems, medical offices and other professionals) at MedCost. When doctors diagnosed medical issues exacerbated by her obesity, she took a hard look at her lifestyle. And wanted to change.

“I am involved in Christian ministries in my personal life,” Claudia said. “I wanted to be in better health. My family and friends supported me to make some new choices.”

MedCost wellness choices inspired Claudia to do things differently. In January of 2016, she braved the cold temperatures to begin walking every morning at 7:30 a.m. with several other employees. She climbed stairs at lunch. She focused on her health.

“I’ve lost 30 pounds,” Claudia said. “I love the fact that I have gone from a size 22 to a size 18. My grandchildren are ten and six. I have to get rid of some more of this weight to keep up with them.”

employee wellness programs

Figure 4. Claudia Johnson after losing 30 pounds

Summary

Inspire your employees. Fit your wellness program to your unique business style and culture. One size won’t fit all, so try different ideas to see what resonates with your employees.

Above all, pour on the encouragement. Your employees are spending a large chunk of their time working for you. Your support may not only boost your bottom line, but improve your employees’ health in a life-changing way.

Your company will produce not only satisfied customers, but loyal, healthier employees.MedCost

 

 

[i] “Eight Things You Need to Know about Employee Wellness Programs,” Alan Kohll, Forbes, April 21, 2016, http://www.forbes.com/sites/alankohll/2016/04/21/8-things-you-need-to-know-about-employee-wellness-programs/2/#4097a3e13e2d

[ii] “Be Stronger, Live Better,” National Association of Health Underwriters Education Foundation, http://www.nahueducationfoundation.org/materials/WellnessBrochure.pdf

[iii] For those enrolled in a High Deductible Health Plan with the company.

[iv] Incentives for Workplace Wellness Programs,” RAND Corporation, http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB9842.html

[v]  “Five Things to Consider When Planning Your Wellness Program,” Dan Birach, HEALTHWORKS Division, Carolinas HealthCare System,  http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/medical-services/prevention-wellness/employer-solutions/healthworks/info-hub

[vi] Kohll, ibid.

[vii] National Association of Health Underwriters Education Foundation, ibid.

A Pharmacist Looks at the Opioid Epidemic

By Zafeira Sarrimanolis, PharmD, MedCost Clinical Consultant

The statistics prove it — more Americans die from accidental drug overdoses each year than from traffic accidents. Data from 2014 showed more deaths from drug overdoses than any other year on record.[i]  Approximately six out of 10 of those deaths involved opioids.[ii]

opioid epidemicSource: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention[iii]

The week of September 18-24 was designatedPrescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week.”[iv] As a pharmacist, I know that opioid medications can be beneficial in controlling certain types of pain. However, this benefit must be weighed against the risks associated with these medications.

The Epidemic

The number of opioid prescriptions in the US quadrupled from 1999 to 2014, while the number of American reporting chronic pain remained constant.[v]

Opioid pain medications like Opana, OxyContin and Percocet were originally used to treat short term-pain, such as after a surgery or accident, and for long-term pain associated with cancer. Today, we see these medications prescribed and utilized more commonly for all forms of pain and over longer periods of time.

The diagram below highlights opioid prescribing patterns in the US. In some states, including NC, the number of painkiller prescriptions per 100 people is equal to or exceeds 100.[vi]

opioid epidemicThere are many sources of misused opioid prescriptions. The majority, approximately 60%, of misusers obtain opioid medications from a friend or relative, either for free, by stealing or by buying them.[vii] 

 

The Dangers

Imagine you are in a car accident and have persistent back pain that makes it difficult for you to sit and stand

comfortably. The doctor prescribes an opioid medication used regularly to control your pain.  Soon you find that you have become dependent on this medication—even after your back feels better.

This scenario happens more often than we think. The danger of opioids is that they can become addictive to any user. For this reason, they should only be prescribed in appropriate cases.

In addition to risk for addiction, these medications are dangerous because of side effects like sedation and respiratory depression. These effects can be compounded when combined with other medications. For example, a common drug interaction with Xanax (a medication used for anxiety) can lead to slowed breathing, oversedation and possible death.

Action Steps

The fight against the opioid epidemic requires action from everyone. Prescribers and pharmacies are more regularly monitoring those taking opioid medications. In North Carolina, the Board of Medicine and Board of Pharmacy have strategies to control these medications to decrease utilization and death from opioid abuse and overdose.

The opioid reversal agent, naloxone, is more readily available from retail pharmacies. Efforts are being made to increase access to treatment for addiction. Communities are educating the public on the dangers of opioids and offeopioid epidemring “take-back” programs for disposal of unused opioid medications.

In July, the US Senate passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, the first major federal legislation on addiction in 40 years. The purpose of this law is to expand education, strengthen state monitoring programs and create new treatment programs.

Real progress can only result when doctors, nurses, pharmacists, patients, government officials, community leaders and the family and friends of those affected work together to put an end to the opioid epidemic.

Pharmacist on Staff for Clients

As the new MedCost Pharmacist, I discuss pharmacy management strategies with clients and brokers to control the explosion of drug costs. Prior authorizations, step therapy programs and quantity limits can be frustrating and disruptive. But we know that these utilization management strategies are key in controlling costs. 

Our partnership with OptumRx, ensures that members take safe, effective medications appropriate for their conditions, while implementing cost-saving strategies.

Opioid epidemic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Source: 
Mercer National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plan -2015l[i]

Our goal at MedCost is to help ensure that our clients’ covered members are being treated appropriately and safely, without the risk of exorbitantly high costs. This will not only be the most cost-effective strategy, but it can result in members with healthier, happier lives.MedCost

 

[i] “The Opioid Epidemic: By the Numbers,” US Health & Human Services, June 15, 2016, http://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/Factsheet-opioids-061516.pdf (accessed September 26, 2016)

[ii] “Injury Prevention & Control: Opioid Overdose,” Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/index.html (accessed September 22, 2016).

[iii] Ibid.

[iv]Office of the White House Press Secretary, September 16, 2016, https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/16/presidential-proclamation-prescription-opioid-and-heroin-epidemic (accessed September 22, 2016).

[v] Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, March 16, 2016, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/rr/rr6501e1.htm (accessed September 22, 2016).

[vi]  “Injury Prevention & Control: Opioid Overdose,” Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, http://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/prescribing.html (accessed September 22, 2016).

[vii] Ibid.

[viii] Bruce Lee, “With the Excise Tax in Their Sights, Employers Hold Health Benefits Cost Growth to 3.8% in 2015,” Mercer, November 19, 2015, http://www.mercer.com/newsroom/national-survey-of-employer-sponsored-health-plans-2015.html (accessed September 22, 2016).

Employee Deductibles Rise Faster Than Wages

ks110111-medEmployer health insurance expenses continued to rise by relatively low amounts this year, aided by moderate increases in total medical spending but also by workers taking a greater share of the costs, new research shows.

Average premiums for employer-sponsored family coverage rose 3.4% for 2016, down from annual increases of nearly twice that much before 2011 and double digits in the early 2000s, according to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

But 3.4% is still faster than recent economic growth, which determines the country’s long-run ability to afford health care.

And the tame premium increases obscure out-of-pocket costs that are being loaded on employees in the form of higher deductibles and copayments. Another new study suggests those shifts have prompted workers and their families to use substantially fewer medical services.

For the first time in Kaiser’s annual survey, more than half the workers in plans covering a single person face a deductible of at least $1,000. Deductibles for family plans are typically even higher.

Deductibles are what consumers pay out of pocket before the insurance kicks in. Employers sometimes contribute to pre-tax accounts to help workers pay such costs.

Employers have been flocking to high-deductible plans in recent years, arguing that exposure to medical costs makes consumers better shoppers.wingeddollar-sm

It also saves employers money. Having workers pay more out of pocket shaved half a percentage point off premium increases of employer-sponsored plans in each of the past two years, Kaiser researchers calculated.

Since 2011, the average deductible for single coverage has soared 63%, according to the survey, while workers’ earnings have gone up by only 11%.

Microsoft PowerPoint - 20160825 Cumulative Slides [Read-Only]

 

 

(Kaiser Health News, Jay Hancock and Shefali Luthra, September 14, 2016)

 

Is Your Health Plan Affected by the Cadillac Tax?

One-Fourth of Employers Now Offering CDHPs to Avoid Tax

Employers continue to take action to avoid the looming excise or “Cadillac” tax on more expensive health insurance for their employees. This Affordable Care Act tax of 40% annually is currently set to take effect in 2020, but it is already having a major impact.

A 2015 Mercer study found that total health benefits cost averaged $11,635 per employee.[i] Cadillac taxThis average amount exceeds the Cadillac tax’s threshold of $10,200 for individuals, and would trigger the 40% tax on benefits above the threshold. And small employers are seeing higher increases in medical, dental and other health benefits than large employers.

Employers Turn to
Consumer Plans                                             

For the first time, 25% of covered employees are now enrolled in Consumer-Driven Health Plans (CDHP). Large employers of 20,000 or more employees have added CDHPs the fastest (73%). A projected 34% of employers with 50+ employees will be subject to the excise tax in 2020 if they make no changes to their current health plans.

 Cadillac tax

 

High-Deductible Health Plans (HDHP) are a type of Consumer-Driven Health Plans. Employers are saving an average of 18% with an HSA-eligible HDHP instead of a traditional Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) plan.[ii]

One key reason that employees are researching medical costs in advance for services such as maternity care, joint replacements and Emergency Room visits. A 2015 Consumer Health Insights’ survey showed that 22% always talked to others about costs or searched websites for information.[iii]

Employees who have a telemedicine option in their health plans can choose a more appropriate level of Cadillac taxcare for certain respiratory infections, fevers and nausea (see “Treatment Alternatives to the Emergency Room”). Choosing the right level of care reduces time away from work, boosting productivity. And employees save unnecessary dollars from their own pockets.

Some employers offer pricing transparency tools such as HealtheReports™ which compares costs for a complete procedure. Employees can review local facilities that offer mammograms, colonoscopies, X-rays and other services. HealtheReports also lists comments from members about their recommendations for health care organizations.

A New Era in Health Care

CDHP plans require a shift in thinking about medical spending. In traditional plans, employees are used to handing over their insurance card and paying a small copay.

PiggyBankIt can come as a jolt to employees to realize that CDHP coverage begins with paying expenses up to a higher deductible before insurance kicks in. For this reason, employers must proactively educate employees when introducing CDHP options.

Our next blog will detail key steps for employers to take in providing tools for smart decision-making. Employers who can manage staff expectations with a balanced understanding of the changing health care industry will build a productive partnership with your team.MedCost

 

[i] “With the Excise Tax in Their Sights, Employers Hold Health Benefits Cost Growth to 3.8% in 2015,” Mercer Global, November 19, 2015, http://www.mercer.com/newsroom/national-survey-of-employer-sponsored-health-plans-2015.html (accessed August 8, 2016)

[ii] Ibid.

[iii] “Debunking Common Myths about Healthcare Consumerism,” McKinsey & Company, December 2015, http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/debunking-common-myths-about-healthcare-consumerism (accessed August 11, 2016)

The Employer Benefit First Offered by NASA

The first place this employer benefit was offered wasn’t even on planet Earth.telemedicine employers

The idea to assess human health from afar started with NASA in the early 1960’s. Both American and Russian doctors were concerned that astronauts might lose circulation and other functions in space. The first telemedicine was practiced on animals attached to medical monitors while orbiting Earth.

TV viewers became familiar with live updates on astronauts’ heart rates, breathing and temperature during space flights. And the technology has translated right into employer benefit plans for medical care for onsite and offsite workers.

Over 15 million Americans obtained medical care remotely in 2015,[i] and the American Telemedicine Association anticipates 30% growth in 2016. Employers have picked up on the cost savings and convenience—nearly 75% of large employers plan to offer telemedicine as a health plan benefit in states that regulate this method, up from 48% in 2015.[ii]

telemedicine employers

Why Telemedicine?

Employers are searching for ways to contain the spiraling costs of health care. The ability for employees to make a call or have a video conference with a board-certified doctor within minutes brings both convenience and less time away from work. A recent analysis by Willis Towers Watch estimated that as much as $6 billion per year could be saved by U. S. companies using telemedicine.[iii]

Where the Savings Come From

Employers are seeing the need to educate employees about the best medical options for every health need. Some fevers, headaches, sore throats and other minor symptoms are appropriate for a telemed call (see “Treatment Alternatives to the Emergency Room”). Average cost: $45.

Compare the cost of a telemed call with an average primary care doctor visit: $145. Or the average cost of an ER visit: $1,316. [iv] Your employees with commutes to work may have to travel longer distances for in-person visits—time also lost in productivity. And many employees allow conditions to worsen before seeking treatment, resulting in even higher expense and time away from work.

“Over 400 million visits a year are appropriate
for telehealth.”

 – Jason Gorevic, Teladoc CEO, NJTV News

Managing Costs in a Complex Environment

As responsibility for paying health bills shifts to the employee, 24/7 services such as Teladoc becometelemedicine employers an increasingly attractive option for appropriate levels of medical care. A board-certified doctor is always available with a cell phone callback, even if an employee is on vacation or lives in a rural area where medical access is more limited.

MedCost clients who use Teladoc have already saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in 2016, avoiding more expensive treatment centers and lost hours at work.

Looming in employers’ minds is the Affordable Care Act’s Cadillac tax, now postponed until 2020. This 40% excise tax would trigger when an employer offers health benefits above $10,200 for an individual and $27,500 for a family.

Employers have already begun to raise employee deductibles and out-of-pocket costs, not included in the value of a health policy.

Summary

Some large employers such as JetBlue Airways are installing telemed kiosks at their workplaces, harnessing technology innovations for immediate care.[v] The Department of Veteran Affairs provided telemedicine employerstelemed services to more than 675,000 veterans in fiscal 2015. Employees who are used to searching for restaurants and shopping deals on cell phones will increasingly call a doctor to get routine medical care.

And it won’t even require a trip to outer space to get it.

 

[i] Melinda Beck, “How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care, Wall Street Journal, June 27, 2016, http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-telemedicine-is-transforming-health-care-1466993402 (accessed July 14, 2016)

[ii] National Business Group on Health, “Health Care Benefits Cost Increases to Hold Steady in 2016,” August 12, 2015, https://www.businessgrouphealth.org/pressroom/pressRelease.cfm?ID=263 (accessed July 18, 2016)

[iii] Willis Towers Watson, “Current Telemedicine Technology Could Mean Big Savings,” August 11, 2014, https://www.towerswatson.com/en-US/Press/2014/08/current-telemedicine-technology-could-mean-big-savings (accessed July 15, 2016)

[iv] Sabrina Rodak, “Study: 71% of ED Visits Unnecessary, Avoidable,” Becker’s Hospital Review, April 25, 2013, http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/capacity-management/study-71-of-ed-visits-unnecessary-avoidable.html (accessed February 23, 2016)

[v] Phil Galewitz, “Kaiser: Your Doctor Will See You Now,” June 20, 2016, http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/06/18/kaiser-how-far-telemedicine-has-come/86084092/ (accessed July 18, 2016)

Childhood Diabetes Rates and Costs Climb

childhood diabetes employer health costsChildhood diabetes rates are on the rise, and a report released Monday pointed to the impact that the cost of their care could have on families — even those who have employer-sponsored health insurance.

The study, conducted by the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI), found that children as old as 18 with diabetes who were insured through an employer-sponsored plan racked up $2,173 per capita in out-of-pocket health care costs in 2014. That spending level was nearly five times higher than that of kids without the illness.

The HCCI researchers analyzed data from claims submitted from 2012 to 2014 through group, individual and Medicare Advantage insurance policies to analyze health care spending and utilization trends among people younger than 65 who had diabetes and employer-sponsored coverage plans.

In terms of use of medical services, children with diabetes visited the emergency room 2.5 times more often than children without it. Acute inpatient services were used nearly five times more often. In all, a year’s worth of care cost $17,380 — the second only to adults aged 55 through 64 with diabetes.

Although more prescriptions and frequent doctor’s visits help explain the difference inchildhood diabetes rates cost the health care costs generated by children with and without this illness, researchers were still surprised by the magnitude of the disparity.

Families are “spending more out-of-pocket across the board on all types of services,” said Amanda Frost, a senior researcher at HCCI. “And it’s just higher use. So when you end up using all of these health care services, you end up with a very personal impact on your wallet, especially if you’re a parent with a child with diabetes.”

(Kaiser Health News, Heredia Rodriguez June 20, 2016)

Kaiser Health News






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Saving Health Costs: A Case Study

It is possible to save on health care costs. Here’s how.

savings hospital admissions health costs

Between 1999 and 2015, employer-sponsored health premiums rose 203%.i Deductibles for workers have mushroomed faster than both income and premiums. Businesses have struggled to find ways to contain these costs while providing for their employees.

This graph, “Health Plan Savings for One Employer,” is a real-life illustration of how wise management based on data analysis has saved millions of dollars for a MedCost client over the past five years.

When this client came to MedCost in 2010, hospital admissions were 87 per 1,000 covered lives. Without any changes in plan design or benefits, the MedCost clinical team ensured that patients received thorough follow-up care to avoid readmissions after joint replacements, cardiac and back surgeries and other procedures.

Skilled nurse managers helped schedule doctor visits and asked questions such as: “Are you taking all your meds? Is there anything you don’t understand about your care?”pregnancy, pregnancies, high risk pregnancy, health costs

Board-certified case managers and highly specialized obstetrical nurses focused on early identification of high-risk pregnancies, offering tips for prenatal care. Sometimes they interacted with doctors’ offices to help families get the answers they needed.

MedCost nurse health coaches worked with patients suffering chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, migraines or congestive heart failure, helping them reduce symptoms, close gaps in care and comply with treatment plans.

The result? Better health for patients, and increasingly lower costs for employers. Since 2011, this employer has enjoyed five consecutive years under budget for health plan expenditures—as a result of data analysis and managing the right care at the right time through MedCost Care Management programs.

It is possible to save on health care expenses, using the right partner to manage employee health effectively. If you would like more information about this case study, please contact Jason Clarke at jclarke@medcost.com.

 

[1] “Recent Trends in Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums,” Kaiser Family Foundation, January 5, 2016, http://kff.org/infographic/visualizing-health-policy-recent-trends-in-employer-sponsored-health-insurance-premiums/ (accessed June 16, 2016).

 

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Hospital Costs Surge with Increased Opioid Abuse

Every day, headlines detail the casualties of the nation’s surge in heroin and prescription painkiller opioid drugsabuse: the funerals, the broken families and the patients cycling in and out of treatment. Now, a new study sheds light on another repercussion — how this public health problem is adding to the nation’s ballooning health care costs and who’s shouldering that burden.

The research comes as policymakers grapple with how to curb the increased abuse of these drugs, known as opioids. State legislators in New York,Connecticut, Alaska and Pennsylvania have tried to take action by adding new resources to boost prevention and treatment. In addition, President Barack Obama laid out strategies last month intended to improve how the health system deals with addiction.

Published Monday in the journal Health Affairs, the study measures how many people were hospitalized between 2002 and 2012 because they were abusing heroin or prescription painkillers, and how many of them got serious infections related to their drug use. It also tracks what hospitals charged to treat those patients and how the hospitals were paid.

(Kaiser Health NewsShefali Luthra, May 2, 2016)

Kaiser Health News

 

 

Health Premiums Growing Faster than Income

Single Employee Insurance Up 48% from 2005-2014

It’s no surprise to employers that health premiums continue to take a bigger spending bite every year. Single employee premiums jumped 48% from 2005 to 2014, reported the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) in February 2016.[i] Estimates at 5% annual growth mean that the cost of insuring employees will outpace average income per capita by two percentage points per year.

health expenses, healthcare costs, employer premiums

Source: CBO with data from 2015 Employer Health Benefits Survey (Kaiser Family Foundation) & Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

The CBO projects average premiums for employer-based coverage at $10,000 for individuals and about $24,500 for family coverage in 2025—an almost 60% increase from 2016.

Costs for government subsidized health insurance will top $600 billion this year. And most Americans who receive subsidies are working full-time. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will account for $110 billion in subsidies.

Looming over employers is the Cadillac tax on more expensive health care insurance. Currently the 40% tax is set to take effect in 2020 (see “Cadillac Tax Revisions” blog), but ACA requirements are impacting employer planning for health benefits.

Since an average 62% of American employees still get their health coverage at work, tracking health care spending remains a major concern for businesses.[i]health premiums, healthcare costs, employer health expenses

As health care laws continue to change, employers must work closely with consultants and benefits administrators who have expert knowledge to get the best performance from every health care dollar.

[i] “Update from 2015 Employer Health Benefits Survey,” Kaiser Family Foundation, February 5, 2016, http://kff.org/private-insurance/issue-brief/a-comparison-of-the-availability-and-cost-of-coverage-for-workers-in-small-firms-and-large-firms-update-from-the-2015-employer-health-benefits-survey/ (accessed April 28, 2016)

[i] “Private Health Insurance Premiums and Federal Policy,” Congressional Budget Office, February 11, 2016, https://www.cbo.gov/publication/51130 (accessed April 4, 2016).

 

US Drug Spending Up 8.5% in 2015

Increases Due to Rising Prices and Prescriptions Filledpills, drugs, medicine, opioids, health costs

U.S. spending on prescription drugs rose 8.5 percent last year, slightly less than in 2014, driven mainly by growing use of ultra-expensive new drugs and price hikes on other medicines.

A report from data firm IMS Health estimates patients, insurers, government programs and other payers spent a combined $309.5 billion last year on prescription medicines.

The IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics is forecasting that annual increases in U.S. prescription drug spending will slow to 4 to 7 percent through 2020, after rising around 10 percent in each of the past three years. It predicts spending will reach $370 billion to $400 billion in 2020.

(Associated Press, April 14, 2016)