2017 Forms 1094, 1095 (B & C) Released by IRS

2017 Forms 1094 1095

Michael BerwangerBy Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The IRS has released the final Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C for calendar year 2017 reporting. Employers are required to report in early 2018 for calendar year 2017. You can find the forms for calendar year 2017 reporting here:

 

What Changed?

For calendar year 2017, the 6055 and 6056 reporting process seems to have stabilized. One notable difference, please note the removal of the “Section 4980H Transition Relief” box from line 22 of Form 1094-C, as this transition relief is no longer available to employers.

There are no substantive changes to the B Forms for 2017, and the instructions are also mostly unchanged.

For purposes of determining affordability of employer-sponsored coverage when using the Qualified Offer method, the instructions note inflation adjustments to the 9.5% threshold, increasing the percentage to 9.66% for plan years beginning in 2016 and 9.69% for plan years beginning in 2017. (This percentage will drop to 9.56% for plan years beginning in 2018. See IRS Publication for details.)

Who Is Required to Report?

2017 Forms 1094-B and 1095-B:

These forms are used by insurers, self-insuring employers, and other parties that provide minimum essential health coverage (regardless of size, except for large self-insuring employers) to report information on this coverage to the IRS and to covered individuals.

Note: Self-insuring employers with less than 50 full-time or full-time equivalent employees will use these forms to report information on coverage to the IRS and to covered individuals. Self-insuring employers with 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees will use the C forms—see below.

1094-C and 1095-C:

Applicable large employers (generally those with 50 or more full-time employees, including full-time equivalents or FTEs) will use Forms 1094-C and 1095-C to report information to the IRS and to their employees about their compliance with the employer-shared responsibility provisions (“pay or play”) and the health care coverage they have offered. Employers subject to both reporting provisions (generally self-insured employers with 50 or more full-time employees, including FTEs) will satisfy their reporting obligations using the C Forms.

Information Reporting Deadlines

The upcoming deadlines for submitting Forms 1094 and 1095 B or C are as follows:

To the IRS:

If filing on paper – February 28, 2018

If filing electronically – April 2, 2018

Any employer who would like to file electronically should refer to the IRS for more information on the AIR Program, which requires at least 30 days for testing for first-time users. Please note that employers submitting more than 250 forms must file electronically.

To Individuals:

Both Form 1095-B and 1095-C are due to the person identified as the “responsible individual” by January 31, 2018.MedCost

MedCost is not a tax preparation company, and you may have additional tax obligations for other benefit plans that you offer to your employees. Please consult with your tax advisor for guidance.This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

House Republicans Introduce Health Care Reform Legislation

health reformBy Brad Roehrenbeck, General Counsel & VP, Legal Services, Compliance

On Monday, House Republicans unveiled the long-awaited legislation intended to overhaul former President Barack Obama’s signature health care legislation, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The bill, titled the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would make major changes to the ACA that impact individuals, employers, insurers, and providers in significant ways, as summarized below.

Provisions Impacting Employer-Sponsored Coverage

The most significant development impacting employers under the proposed law is removal of the employer mandate.

  • Large employers would no longer face penalties for failing to offer coverage that meets the minimum value and minimum essential coverage requirements of the ACA. 
  • Additionally, the proposed bill would repeal the widely unpopular excise tax on high-cost coverage (the so-called Cadillac Tax) and offer tax credits to small businesses for providing coverage to employees. 
  • The law would also require employers to indicate on Form W2 the months of coverage each employee was eligible for coverage. (Note: It appears the legislation is intended also to eliminate the ACA’s annual employer 1094/1095 reporting under Section 6056 of the Code. That would be a natural by-product of the employer mandate repeal, but the bill does not appear to eliminate this obligation expressly. This may be addressed in a future amendment to the bill.) 

Changes to Account-Based Plans

health reformThe AHCA would make some significant changes to the rules governing HSA accounts for the first time since 2004.

  • The bill would increase the annual HSA contribution limit to equal the out-of-pocket maximum amount established for that year under the HSA rules (currently $6,550 for self-only coverage and $13,100 for family coverage).
  • The rules would also be modified to allow both spouses (if over 55) to make “catch-up” contributions to the same HSA account.
  • Also, a new special rule would allow HSA account holders to use HSA funds to pay for health care services performed up to 60 days prior to the account being established.
  • The bill would also reduce the excise tax on distributions not used for medical expenses from 20% to 10%.
  • Finally, the AHCA would remove the ACA’s cap on contributions to health FSA plans.

Changes to the Individual Market

While leaving in place popular provisions of the ACA such as the requirements that insurers cover dependents up to the age of 26 and pre-existing conditions, the AHCA would otherwise significantly redesign the ACA’s changes to the individual market.

  • First, the bill does away with the individual mandate and repeals the cost-sharing subsidies and premium tax credits made available under the ACA to individuals who enroll in coverage on the exchanges.
  • In turn, the AHCA puts in place refundable tax credits that individuals could use to defray the cost of coverage, including coverage outside the exchanges.
  • Like under the ACA, these tax credits are eligible for advance payment. The amount of the credits will vary based on age and income, and excess payments can be deposited directly into an HSA account.
  • Tax credits are not available for any coverage that includes abortion services.

health reformIn place of the individual mandate, to incentivize individuals to maintain coverage, the bill provides for increased premiums (30% for 12 months) for individuals who have had a gap in coverage of at least 63 days.

  • The bill also creates the “Patient and State Stability Fund,” which provides significant payments to states ($10 to $15 billion per year through 2026) to help stabilize the individual and small group insurance markets and to assist high-risk patients.
  • Also, beginning in 2020, the ACA’s requirements around essential health benefits will sunset.
  • Finally, the bill allows carriers greater flexibility to vary premiums based on age by up to a 5:1 ratio, up from 3:1 under the ACA.

Changes in the Medicaid Program

Unsurprisingly, the AHCA would repeal the ACA’s expansion of the Medicaid program.

  • It would also put into place a per-capital allotment of federal Medicaid dollars to the states, which is expected to rein in the future federal financial commitment to the program.
  • Similar to other provisions, the bill would bar Medicaid dollars from being used on abortion providers.
  • It would also require states to disenroll high-dollar lottery winners and incentivize states to assess participant eligibility on a more frequent basis. (Note: The bill will also reverse major cuts to the Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital program, which provides safety net funding to more than 3,000 hospitals that disproportionately treat indigent patients).

Repeal of ACA Taxes

Finally, the AHCA would repeal numerous taxes—in addition to the Cadillac Tax discussed above—that either have gone into effect or are expected to become effective under the ACA.

  • Among those are:
    • The insurer tax (effectively a federal insurance premium tax),
    • The prescription medication tax,
    • The tax on over-the-counter medications,
    • The medical device tax.
    • It would also eliminate taxes on high-income earners that were levied under the ACA to help pay for the law.

health reformRepublicans have signaled an aggressive timeline for deliberations on the law. Committee hearings are expected to take place immediately, and the bill could reach the floor of the House in as little as one week.

President Trump has forecasted that he would like to sign the bill by Easter. We will continue to monitor developments, including any changes in the bill as it moves through the legislative process.MedCost

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

ACA Reporting Due Early 2017

ACA DeadlinesBy Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

In early 2017, employers and insurance carriers must report information to employees and the IRS about coverage offered to employees under employer-sponsored health plans during calendar year 2016.

Background

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires self-funded employers to satisfy two reporting obligations under Sections 6055 and 6056 of the Internal Revenue Code, relating to health coverage offered to employees and about those employees who are covered under the plan.

The purpose of the reporting obligations is to allow the IRS access to data needed to monitor compliance with both the employer and individual mandates. The reporting also may be used by affected employees in assessing their own compliance with the individual mandate and/or in seeking subsidized coverage on the federal and state exchanges established under the ACA (as described in this blog post).

Section 60ACA reporting55 Reporting Compliance

Under Section 6055 of the Internal Revenue Code, all self-funded employers must annually report information to the IRS and to any individual who is covered under a health plan offered by the employer.

Currently, many employers do not have access to Social Security numbers for non-employed dependents, creating a fairly significant compliance burden to collect that data. The regulations require that employers exercise “reasonable collection efforts” to obtain that information. (Typically, an employer will satisfy that standard by documenting at least two efforts to request the data from those individuals). This same information must be reported to employees, along with basic contact information for the employer.

Section 6056 Reporting Compliance

The second reporting obligation, under Code Section 6056, applies only to “Applicable Large Employers.” Applicable Large Employers are those employers with at least 50 full-time equivalent employees and to whom the ACA’s employer mandate applies.

Unlike Section 6055 reporting, all of this information also must be provided separately to each employee, full-time, part-time, or otherwise. You can read helpful IRS guidance about 6056 reporting here.

IRS Forms 1094 and 1095

The compliance obligations are complex, and the IRS has developed forms (Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C) to provide consistency in reporting and to help simplify the process for employers.

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) who offer coverage under a self-funded health plan may use Form 1095-C, which combines the reporting obligations of Sections 6055 and 6056 in a single form for reporting to both the IRS and individuals. When the forms are provided to the IRS, the Applicable Large Employer also must submit a transmittal form, Form 1094-C. Forms 1095-C and 1094-C, along with instructions, can be accessed here.

Small employers with fewer than 50 full-time equivalent employees are only required to meet one of the reporting obligations, the Minimum Essential Coverage reporting under Section 6055. Small employers may use Form 1095-B, with transmittal Form 1094-B. These forms, along with instructions, can be accessed onACA reporting the IRS web site here.

Changes from reporting year 2015 to 2016 for forms 1094-C and 1095-C can be found here.

Changes from reporting year 2015 to 2016 for forms 1094-B and 1095-B can be found here.

Compliance Deadline

Filings will begin in early 2017 for the 2016 calendar year.

*Form 1095-C must be provided to all employees (full-time, part-time, or otherwise) by March 2, 2017.

*All Forms 1095-C, along with the transmittal form, 1094-C, must be provided to the IRS by February 28, 2017 (if in paper form), or March 31, 2017 (if filed electronically). 

Note: Employers filing more than 250 information returns (Form 1095-C) must do so electronically.MedCost

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IRS Extends Due Dates for New 2015 Reporting

IRS due datesOn Dec. 28, the IRS extended the due dates for new health care information reporting forms in 2016. Insurers, self-insuring employers, other coverage providers, and applicable large employers now have additional time to provide health coverage information for 2015 to individual taxpayers and the IRS. Providers and certain employers must now furnish individuals with either Form 1095-B or 1095-C by March 31, 2016. The due dates for issuers filing these forms and the associated Form 1094 with the IRS are May 31, 2016, for paper filers and June 30, 2016, for electronic filers.

Individual taxpayers will generally not be affected by this extension and should file their tax returns as they normally would. However, due to these extensions, some individual taxpayers may not receive a Form 1095-B or Form 1095-C by the time they are ready to file their 2015 tax return. While the information on these forms may assist in preparing a return, they are not required. Like last year, taxpayers can prepare and file their returns using other information about their health insurance. Individuals do not have to wait for their Form 1095-B or 1095-C in order to file.

These extensions apply automatically to all health coverage information return issuers and are longer than the 30-day extensions that would otherwise be obtained by submitting Form 8809, Application for Extension of Time To File Information Returns. Therefore, the IRS will not process any previously requested extensions of these deadlines for 2016. The longer automatic extensions do not require a formal request using Form 8809 or other documentation. The IRS does not anticipate additional extensions.

The IRS has not extended the due dates for Health Insurance Marketplaces to issue Form 1095-A. Individuals who enrolled for coverage through the Marketplace should receive Form 1095-A by February 1, 2016, and should wait to file their returns until they receive their Form 1095-A.

 For more information: https://www.irs.gov/Affordable-Care-Act/IRS-Extends-Due-Dates-for-New-2015-Information-Reporting-Requirements

How to Fill Out IRS Forms 1094/1095

By MedCost General Counsel Brad Roehrenbeck, JD

1094-C tax form

Employers heard some good news when the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) extended deadlines for reporting 2015 forms 1094/1095 (see “IRS Extends Deadline for 2015 ACA Reporting”).

Concerned about meeting this first year of Affordable Care Act (ACA) reporting requirements? MedCost General Counsel Brad Roehrenbeck gives step-by-step instructions about how to fill out IRS forms 1094 and 1095 in a free webinar offered here.

Small self-funded employers (those with less than 50 full-time equivalent employees) are only required to meet one of the two ACA-mandated reporting obligations. Specifically, small self-funded employers must meet the Minimum Essential Coverage (MEC) reporting obligation, by reporting on individuals to whom they have provided health coverage during 2015 using Forms 1094-B and 1095-B.

On the other hand, Applicable Large Employers (ALE)—those with more than 50 full-time (equivalent) employees—must report additional information beyond that included in the MEC reporting required of small employers. The IRS has developed a single set of forms (Forms 1094-C and 1095-C) that can be used by Applicable Large Employers to meet all of their reporting requirements.

These ACA-mandated reporting obligations are designed to document compliance with the Affordable Care Act’s two flagship mandates – the individual and employer mandates.

DeWebinar buttonadlines are soon approaching to file these forms. For more information, watch this webinar on 1094/1095 reporting.