IRS Reposts Revised Form 720 for PCORI Fee: Deadline 7/30/17

Michael BerwangerBy Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The IRS recently reposted the April 2017 version of Form 720 (Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return) on its website.* While the form’s primary purpose is to serve as the quarterly return for various federal excise taxes, it also is used to report PCORI fees imposed under health care reform. (For more information on PCORI, see  “PCORI Fee for Self-Funded Employers”.)

Please note, the portion of the form related to the PCORI fees is unaffected. While Form 720 is filed quarterly for other federal excise taxes, the PCORI fee reporting and payment are only required annually, by July 31 of the year following the calendar year in which the applicable policy or plan year ended. The change noted at the beginning of the form is related to the excise taxes.

IRS form 720As background, PCORI fees, used to fund research on patient-centered outcomes, apply to plan and policy years ending before October 1, 2019. They are payable by insurers and sponsors of self-insured health plans, and are calculated by multiplying the applicable dollar amount for the year by the average number of covered lives. As announced in IRS Notice 2016-64, the fees owed in 2017 are as follows:

  • For plan years** ending on or after October 1, 2015, and before October 1, 2016: $2.17 per covered life
  • For plan years** ending on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017: $2.26 per covered life

If you have already filed and used the form posted prior to the most recent update, please contact a tax professional on whether refiling is necessary.MedCost

______________________________________________________________________________

*If you downloaded the Form 720 (Rev. April 2017) before July 3, 2017, please note that
on page 2, under IRS No. 33, the rate is corrected to 12% of the sales price, not 12%
of the sales tax.)

*’*Plan year’ is generally the 12-month period stated in the Summary Plan Description, or for plans filing a Form 5500, the plan year stated in that filing. NOTE: The plan year may be different from the benefit year or the renewal period.

______________________________________________________________________________

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

3 Compliance Areas for Self-Funded Employers (Video)

self-funded employer compliance

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“There are three primary areas that employers should keep in mind when thinking about compliance for their health plan,” said Brad Roehrenbeck, General Counsel and VP of Legal Services and Compliance at MedCost.

1. Employment Retirement Income Security Act 

“The first of those is the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), which governs employer-sponsored benefit plans. ERISA was a law created in the early 1970s that has been applied to basically set the rules for how an employer that creates their own health plan should do that.”

Michael Berwanger, Director of Quality Management and Compliance, agreed. “ERISA requires several things of plan sponsors and plan administrators. One of those things is to provide notices of what benefits are available to employees. The types of notices that you might expect with the summary plan document are any tax filing notices you might need to be aware of.

self-funded employer compliance“This is to make employees aware of the rights available to them under ERISA. And with the right service provider, employers can feel confident knowing they’re distributing the right notices in the right formats.

2. HIPAA Compliance

“The second area of compliance for self-funded employers is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). HIPAA requires that you safeguard patient data. Employers might find themselves subject to certain HIPAA rules; and with the right service provider, it could be relatively easy to navigate those waters.”

Keeping track of privacy obligations with documents that contain patient information is very important, said Brad Roehrenbeck. “Another thing that HIPAA requires is that anyone who handles that information, particularly if it’s electronic, must keep it secure. That basically means that you have to have systems in place that control who has access to that type of information, if you’re keeping it on your systems.

“HR directors want to make sure that they work with their IT departments to look at what kind of controls are in place, who has access to any folders where patient data is maintained, or anything else in relation to running the health plan. The HR department keeps that sensitive member information for the plan.

3. Internal Revenue Service Compliance

“The third primary area of the law that impacts health plans is tax laws. Like other types of benefit plans, health plans come with a tax benefit to both employees and employers. As dollars go in to support the plan, those dollars are provided on a tax-free basis.”

self-funded employer compliance“There are certainly tax advantages when you’re considering self-funding your health plan,” Michael Berwanger said. “To take advantage of those, you need to be aware of your compliance obligations -things like making sure you’re not discriminating unfairly in favor of your highly compensated employees.”

“There’s one other area of the tax laws that actually provides some additional benefit to employers and employees, and that is this concept of a Health Savings Account (HSA). Health savings accounts are a great vehicle under the tax laws where employees can set aside dollars and employers can contribute dollars on a tax-free basis. Those monies can be used toward deductibles and the payment of claims. Employees can keep that money for the rest of their lives or until such time as they need to use that for their medical expenses.

HSAs are a great asset for employees and a great savings vehicle. More importantly, it’s a great avenue for employers to engage with participants in the health plans to be conscious of where their health plan dollars are spent and to use them in a way that not only promotes their own health, but also the financial stability and viability and strength of both their dollars and the health plan dollars,” Mr. Roehrenbeck said.

self-funded employer compliance“As the markets continue to move towards a consumer-driven economy, it’s important for employees to be mindful of their options and how to best take advantage of the benefits available through their employers,” Mr. Berwanger noted.

“We find ourselves in a challenging environment. It’s important to be able to offer great incentives and great packages to employees. A self-funded health plan is a great opportunity to be able to do that.

“The risk can be worth the reward. Managing those compliance obligations isn’t as complicated as you might think, once you have a good trusted advisor to help you navigate that.”MedCost

(This post is a transcript from the video, “3 Compliance Areas for Self-Funded Employers.”)

 

 

PCORI Fee for Self-Funded Employers: Due July 2017

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

 PCORI Required by ACA

PCORI due datesThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes provisions to promote research by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) that will provide information on the relative strengths and weaknesses of various medical interventions. This initiative is being funded by a tax that must be paid by insurers and plan sponsors of self-funded health plans. Per IRS Guidance, for self-insured and/or self-funded plans ending in 2016, filing and payment must be submitted to the IRS by July 31, 2017. The fees owed in 2017 are as follows:

  • For plan years* ending on or after October 1, 2015, and before October 1, 2016: $2.17 per covered life
  • For plan years* ending on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017: $2.26 per covered life

*’Plan year’ is generally the 12-month period stated in the Summary Plan Description, or for plans filing a Form 5500, the plan year stated in that filing. NOTE: The plan year may be different from the benefit year or the renewal period.

 PCORI Fee Payments

PCORI due dateUnder the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) final rule, plan sponsors are responsible for paying the fee, which is treated as an excise tax by the IRS. A Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return (Form 720) must be used when reporting liability for the fee. The form can be accessed at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f720.pdf. Instructions for completing and filing the form can be accessed at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i720.pdf. Completion of the form is relatively simple.  As described here, only the relevant parts of the form need to be completed, which include:

  • Identifying information at the beginning of the form
  • Part II, line 133 (“Applicable self-insured plans” line)
  • Part III, items 3 and 10
  • The signature section
  • The voucher form, if the form is mailed
  • The form may be filed electronically or mailed to:

Department of the Treasury
Internal Revenue Service
Cincinnati, OH 45999-0009

Additional Tips

The following information may be helpful in determining your tax obligation under the PCORI provision:

  • The plan sponsor must apply a single calculation method in determining the average number of lives covered under the plan for the entire plan year. However, the plan sponsor is not required to use the same method from one plan year to the next.
  • HRA and Self-Insured Plans: A self-insured Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) is not subject to a separate fee if the HRA is integrated with another applicable self-insured health plan that provides major medical coverage. The HRA and the other plan must be established or maintained by the same plan sponsor with the same plan year.
    • However, if a self-insured HRA is integrated with an insured group health plan, then the fee must be paid for both the self-insured product and the insured product.
  • Excepted Benefits: Excepted benefits (as defined under section 9832c of the U.S. Code) are exempt from the fee, as is a health Flexible Spending Account (FSA) that satisfies the requirements of an excepted benefit.
  • All plans that provide medical coverage to employees owe this fee. The insurer/carrier for fully-insured plans will pay the fee (typically, the fee is passed on to the plan). The plan sponsor for self-funded plans will pay the fee. Note, there is no exception for small employers, government, church or not-for-profit plans, nor for grandfathered plans or union plans. The fee is tax-deductible.
  • For more information, see: IRS FAQ or IRS chart that shows which plans owe the fee.

NOTE: MedCost is not a tax preparation company, and you may have additional tax obligations for other benefit plans that you offer to your employees. Please consult with your tax advisor for guidance. This blog post should not be considered as tax or legal advice.MedCost

 

2018 HSA and HDHP Dollar Limits Released by IRS

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The IRS has released Revenue Procedure 2017-37, setting the 2018 dollar limitations for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans (HDHPs).

The contribution, deductible and out-of-pocket limitations for 2018 are shown in the table below. All of these amounts are scheduled to increase from 2017. (The 2017 limits are included for reference.)

2018 HSA HDHP

For guidance on HSAs, please review the IRS frequently asked questions’ page at https://www.irs.gov/publications/p969/ar02.html.MedCost

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice.

 

ACA Reporting Due Early 2017

ACA DeadlinesBy Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

In early 2017, employers and insurance carriers must report information to employees and the IRS about coverage offered to employees under employer-sponsored health plans during calendar year 2016.

Background

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires self-funded employers to satisfy two reporting obligations under Sections 6055 and 6056 of the Internal Revenue Code, relating to health coverage offered to employees and about those employees who are covered under the plan.

The purpose of the reporting obligations is to allow the IRS access to data needed to monitor compliance with both the employer and individual mandates. The reporting also may be used by affected employees in assessing their own compliance with the individual mandate and/or in seeking subsidized coverage on the federal and state exchanges established under the ACA (as described in this blog post).

Section 60ACA reporting55 Reporting Compliance

Under Section 6055 of the Internal Revenue Code, all self-funded employers must annually report information to the IRS and to any individual who is covered under a health plan offered by the employer.

Currently, many employers do not have access to Social Security numbers for non-employed dependents, creating a fairly significant compliance burden to collect that data. The regulations require that employers exercise “reasonable collection efforts” to obtain that information. (Typically, an employer will satisfy that standard by documenting at least two efforts to request the data from those individuals). This same information must be reported to employees, along with basic contact information for the employer.

Section 6056 Reporting Compliance

The second reporting obligation, under Code Section 6056, applies only to “Applicable Large Employers.” Applicable Large Employers are those employers with at least 50 full-time equivalent employees and to whom the ACA’s employer mandate applies.

Unlike Section 6055 reporting, all of this information also must be provided separately to each employee, full-time, part-time, or otherwise. You can read helpful IRS guidance about 6056 reporting here.

IRS Forms 1094 and 1095

The compliance obligations are complex, and the IRS has developed forms (Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C) to provide consistency in reporting and to help simplify the process for employers.

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) who offer coverage under a self-funded health plan may use Form 1095-C, which combines the reporting obligations of Sections 6055 and 6056 in a single form for reporting to both the IRS and individuals. When the forms are provided to the IRS, the Applicable Large Employer also must submit a transmittal form, Form 1094-C. Forms 1095-C and 1094-C, along with instructions, can be accessed here.

Small employers with fewer than 50 full-time equivalent employees are only required to meet one of the reporting obligations, the Minimum Essential Coverage reporting under Section 6055. Small employers may use Form 1095-B, with transmittal Form 1094-B. These forms, along with instructions, can be accessed onACA reporting the IRS web site here.

Changes from reporting year 2015 to 2016 for forms 1094-C and 1095-C can be found here.

Changes from reporting year 2015 to 2016 for forms 1094-B and 1095-B can be found here.

Compliance Deadline

Filings will begin in early 2017 for the 2016 calendar year.

*Form 1095-C must be provided to all employees (full-time, part-time, or otherwise) by March 2, 2017.

*All Forms 1095-C, along with the transmittal form, 1094-C, must be provided to the IRS by February 28, 2017 (if in paper form), or March 31, 2017 (if filed electronically). 

Note: Employers filing more than 250 information returns (Form 1095-C) must do so electronically.MedCost

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2016 ACA Employer Deadlines Extended

2016 ACA Employer Deadlines

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Notice 2016-70, which extends the due date for furnishing to individuals the 2016 Form 1095-B (titled Health Coverage), and the 2016 Form 1095-C (titled Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage), from January 31, 2017 to March 2, 2017.

Self-funded employers should note that the filing deadlines remain unchanged. The Notice states that the “Treasury and the [Internal Revenue] Service have determined that there is no similar need for additional time for employers, insurers, and other providers of minimum essential coverage to file with the Service the 2016 Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C.”

Employer Deadlines

Therefore, the due dates for filing 2016 Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C with the IRS remain:

February 28, 2017 (for paper filing)

March 31, 2017 (for e-filing)

Employers may obtain a 30-day extension for filing with the IRS by filing Form 8809 on or before the forms’ due date.

The IRS has also extended last year’s good-faith transition relief for inaccurate information on the forms. Recognizing the “challenges involved in developing new procedures and systems to accurately collect and report information in compliance with new reporting requirements,” the IRS has provided relief to incorrect and incomplete information reported on the statement or return.

Please note: The good-faith relief applies only to data on the forms, not failure to comply with due dates.MedCost

 

IRS Announces 2017 FSA Limits

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

The Internal Revenue Service recently announced the tax year 2017 annual inflation adjustments for more than 50 tax provisions.

Notably, for the first time in two years and consistent with industry expectations, the IRS has increased the dollar limitation under § 125(i) on voluntary employee salary reductions for contributions to health Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA) from $2,550 to $2,600.

The Revenue Procedure 2016-55 provides details about these annual adjustments. The tax year 2017 adjustments generally are used on tax returns filed in 2018.

2017 FSA

 

 

 

For guidance on FSAs, please review the IRS Frequently Asked Questions page.

 

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What to Do If You Receive This Notice

By Michael Berwanger, JD, Director, Quality Management & Compliance

You may receive a notice from the Health Insurance Marketplace or an Exchange regarding former or current employees who received a tax credit on an exchange. (Click here to view a redacted notice example.)

If you receive such a notice, this communication summarizes the purpose of the notice, why you as an employer are receiving the notice, and what you may need to do in response to the notice. For more information, a detailed Question and Answer document has been provided by the IRS here.

What are the notices?

The notices from the Exchanges are in connection to the employer shared responsibility provisions, sometimes referred to as pay or play” tax provisions, and notify the employer about individual(s) who:

(1) have received a premium tax credit to purchase health insurance on the Exchange, and

(2) who reported the name of their employer during the tax credit application process.

These notices are part of the Exchange verification process under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) for determining eligibility for premium tax credits and reduced cost-sharing, and for exemption from the individual mandate tax.

Why would an employer receive these notices?

Tax form & glassesUnder the ACA, certain employers (those with at least 50 full-time employees or full-time equivalents, also known as applicable large employers) might have to pay an employer shared responsibility payment for any month that at least one full-time employee enrolled in Marketplace coverage and received an advanced premium tax credit, or cost sharing reduction. You can read about eligibility thresholds here.

Individuals are only eligible for tax credits on the Health Insurance Marketplace/Exchange if they do not have minimum essential coverage available through their employer, or they are not offered affordable minimum value employer coverage. (Additionally, they must meet specified income and US residency requirements). Thus, employees who have affordable employer coverage available should not qualify for subsidies to buy health insurance in the Exchange.

As part of the application process for a premium tax credit or cost-sharing reduction, an applicant may submit to the Exchange that their employer:

  • did not offer coverage to the employee while employed by the employer,
  • the employer provided coverage but it was not “affordable” or did not provide “minimum value”, or
  • the employee was in a waiting period and unable to enroll in health care coverage. (Please see IRS Notice 2012-58 for an explanation of waiting period rules).

If an Exchange determines that an applicant is eligible to receive an advanced premium tax credit or cost-sharing reduction, and that finding was based at least in part on the above factors, the Marketplace will likely investigate to determine if the employer must pay an employer shared responsibility payment.

Why should an employer pay attention to these notices?

In 2016, employers with at least 50 full-time employees or full-time equivalents are subject to “play-or-pay” penalties if at least one full-time employee receives a subsidy to buy insurance in an Exchange. These notices from the Exchanges alert employers that some of their employees have qualified for premium tax credits and the employer faces potential penalties. Please note that only the IRS, not the Marketplace, can determine whether an employer will owe an employer shared responsibility payment.

health insurance noticesThe notice provides a 90-day response window from the date stated on the notice. Thus, employers will want to respond to the Exchange if they did offer a particular employee coverage that was affordable and provided minimum value, or if the notice is otherwise inaccurate.

What should employers do if they receive a notice?

Employers are not required to respond to Exchange notices, but it will be in an employer’s best interest to respond if the notice is regarding a full-time employee who was actually offered coverage, or if the employee misreported information and was not actually entitled to coverage. If you choose to appeal the notice, you can do so here, at the HealthCare.gov website. Any responses must be made within the 90-day verification process time. Please note that it is likely Exchanges will send notices to whatever employer address the employee provided on his/her application for Exchange coverage.

How can an employer file an appeal?

Employers have 90 days from the date stated on the notice from the Marketplace to file an appeal. This appeal can be filed either by:

  • Completing the Employer Appeal Request Form or:
  • Submitting a letter with the following information:
    • Business name
    • Employer ID Number (EIN)
    • Employer’s primary contact name, phone number and address
    • The reason for the appeal
    • Information from the Marketplace notice received, including date and employee information

Mail the appeal request form or letter, along with a copy of the Marketplace notice, to the following address, or fax the documents to 1-877-369-0129:

Department of Health and Human Services
Health Insurance Marketplace
465 Industrial Blvd.
London, KY 40750-0061

Information supporting your appeal may be included.MedCost

This blog post should not be considered as legal advice. For more information, consult your broker, legal advisor or the Department of Health and Human Services.

IRS Extends Due Dates for New 2015 Reporting

IRS due datesOn Dec. 28, the IRS extended the due dates for new health care information reporting forms in 2016. Insurers, self-insuring employers, other coverage providers, and applicable large employers now have additional time to provide health coverage information for 2015 to individual taxpayers and the IRS. Providers and certain employers must now furnish individuals with either Form 1095-B or 1095-C by March 31, 2016. The due dates for issuers filing these forms and the associated Form 1094 with the IRS are May 31, 2016, for paper filers and June 30, 2016, for electronic filers.

Individual taxpayers will generally not be affected by this extension and should file their tax returns as they normally would. However, due to these extensions, some individual taxpayers may not receive a Form 1095-B or Form 1095-C by the time they are ready to file their 2015 tax return. While the information on these forms may assist in preparing a return, they are not required. Like last year, taxpayers can prepare and file their returns using other information about their health insurance. Individuals do not have to wait for their Form 1095-B or 1095-C in order to file.

These extensions apply automatically to all health coverage information return issuers and are longer than the 30-day extensions that would otherwise be obtained by submitting Form 8809, Application for Extension of Time To File Information Returns. Therefore, the IRS will not process any previously requested extensions of these deadlines for 2016. The longer automatic extensions do not require a formal request using Form 8809 or other documentation. The IRS does not anticipate additional extensions.

The IRS has not extended the due dates for Health Insurance Marketplaces to issue Form 1095-A. Individuals who enrolled for coverage through the Marketplace should receive Form 1095-A by February 1, 2016, and should wait to file their returns until they receive their Form 1095-A.

 For more information: https://www.irs.gov/Affordable-Care-Act/IRS-Extends-Due-Dates-for-New-2015-Information-Reporting-Requirements

How to Fill Out IRS Forms 1094/1095

By MedCost General Counsel Brad Roehrenbeck, JD

1094-C tax form

Employers heard some good news when the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) extended deadlines for reporting 2015 forms 1094/1095 (see “IRS Extends Deadline for 2015 ACA Reporting”).

Concerned about meeting this first year of Affordable Care Act (ACA) reporting requirements? MedCost General Counsel Brad Roehrenbeck gives step-by-step instructions about how to fill out IRS forms 1094 and 1095 in a free webinar offered here.

Small self-funded employers (those with less than 50 full-time equivalent employees) are only required to meet one of the two ACA-mandated reporting obligations. Specifically, small self-funded employers must meet the Minimum Essential Coverage (MEC) reporting obligation, by reporting on individuals to whom they have provided health coverage during 2015 using Forms 1094-B and 1095-B.

On the other hand, Applicable Large Employers (ALE)—those with more than 50 full-time (equivalent) employees—must report additional information beyond that included in the MEC reporting required of small employers. The IRS has developed a single set of forms (Forms 1094-C and 1095-C) that can be used by Applicable Large Employers to meet all of their reporting requirements.

These ACA-mandated reporting obligations are designed to document compliance with the Affordable Care Act’s two flagship mandates – the individual and employer mandates.

DeWebinar buttonadlines are soon approaching to file these forms. For more information, watch this webinar on 1094/1095 reporting.